Language Of Sensation -Intensive-

A workshop for those who love to dance contact improvisation and are interested in exploring somatic approaches to expand the possibilities of their dancing. We will move between exercises aiming to clarify the sensations which lie at the heart of CI and exploring scores that point towards different types of CI vocabulary.

The idea of this approach is to minimise the teaching of set material (moves, tricks, etc) and instead to maximise the opportunities of participants to discover material for themselves through their own research and exploration.

Very simply, I set up calm and simple experiments in which we can experience a range of sensations without any demand to move very much. And then we dance a lot. Often there are unusual rules for the dances. Sometimes there are none and you can improvise freely.

While the workshop aims to support the development of our CI movement vocabulary, it does so through enriching the sensory skills that enable us to improvise with each other.

 

Malcolm Manning (UK/FIN): I think of myself as a somatic movement researcher, educator, mentor and artist. In my classes, I share my inquiry of what it is to be a thinking, feeling, moving subject in this world through developing a dialogue with ourselves and our environment in which we are empowered to be our own experts.

I offer my work as a resource for performing arts professionals in dance centres, for dance companies, at festivals, and on higher education programmes. I also teach a workshop series for every body called BodySchool in which I apply my work to everyday life situations.

I am certified to teach the Feldenkrais Method® and the Body And Earth work developed by Andrea Olsen and Caryn McHose. I studied for two years at SNDO Amsterdam and have an MA in Dance Pedagogy. I have also made extensive studies of Authentic Movement, Movement Shiatsu, Body Mind Centering and experiential anatomy.

I was also part of the group of students who studied regularly throughout the ‘90s with Nancy Stark Smith, participating in her research into what she later named the UnderScore.

For more info visit www.movetolearn.com